Home Network Research Paper

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Home Network

Descriptions

The above home network comprises of several devices connected to the network. Besides the devices, it has other communication protocols. The above diagram is a configuration of the ADSL wireless router connected from the Internet. Other devices on the network are VoIP phone although not shown on the diagram, printers, personal computers (PC), smart television, and PDAs such as mobile computing devices. The devices are connected with an RJ45 Category 7 UTP cable to the ADSL wireless router. There are some devices connected to the network through the ADSL wireless router wirelessly. However, some of the PCs are installed with a Network Interface Card (NIC) (Zahariadis, 2003).

The network also incorporates settings and configurations where all the IP addresses of the devices connected to the network are within the Transfer Control Protocol/Internet Protocol (TCP/IP). The network is configured using the static IP addresses which implemented with class C private addressing settings ranging from 192.168.5…..

Where devices are connected with a wire in the network, category 7 of the cable is used. The cable supports IP phone comprehensively which connects the telephone and video cable that connect it to the game components. The IP network transfers data as well as supporting voice. The ADSL wireless router has been manufactured by the Verizon Company and has configured in such a way that it will support high speed based on the connections via the dial-up connections (Harrington, 2007).

The Verizon Company manufactures most of the connecting devices in the home network. The ADSL wireless router has been connected to the Internet through the firewall using dial-up operations. The router also connects other devices such as VoIP to the network using the telephone lines. Other devices connected using the cables are connected using the Category 7 Gigabit Ethernet wire. Some of the devices, such as ADSL wireless router in the Network comprehensively support the Institute of Electrical and Electronic Engineers (IEEE) wireless protocol standards. The wireless protocol standards are represented by 802.11b/g/n. The home network also implements the Network Addressing Translation (NAT) protocols. Therefore, the network can easily share the IP addresses whenever there is a need. The router also has other features such as inbuilt Gigabit Ethernet, which has four ports network switch supporting the connections of the devices connected to the network using the cable. The ADSL wireless router also has USB ports that support expansion of the external storage using the flash drives and other external hard drive devices (Yokotani, 2010).

The devices are connected to the Internet using a firewall thus securing the devices. The devices in the network are secured from attacks ranging from IP spoofing, denial of service attacks (DoS), intrusion, and death pinging among many others. For the devices connected to the network wirelessly, they are secured from some of the above attacks by Wired Equivalent Protocol (WEP) specifically for the 64 and 128-bit wireless encryption and Wi-Fi Protected Access (WPA). The home network also configures the security settings thus allowing it to filter MAC addresses. Other devices within the network are gaming components, laptops, and PDAs among many others. The home network has a dedicated server. All the computing devices run on the Microsoft operating system while the PDAs have their operating system specifically the Android (Brewer, 2009).

References

Brewer, D. C. (2009). Picture yourself networking your home or small office: Step-by-step             instruction for designing, installing, and managing a wired or wireless computer    network. Boston, Mass: Course Technology.

Harrington, J. L. (2007). Ethernet networking for the small office and professional home office.      Amsterdam: Morgan Kaufmann Publishers/Elsevier.

Yokotani, T. (2010). Next Generation Home Network and Home Gateway Associated with         Optical Access.

Zahariadis, T. B. (2003). Home networking technologies and standards. Boston: Artech House.

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